Shehzad H. Qazi

Shehzad H. Qazi is a fellow at the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding. His research areas include insurgent mobilization, counterinsurgency, U.S. foreign policy and South Asian politics. Shehzad was formerly a Junior Research Scholar at New York University’s Department of Economics and a Mary F. Crisler scholar at the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts. He holds an M.A. in International Relations from New York University.

Articles written by Shehzad H. Qazi

USAID Promotes Public-Private Partnerships in High-Risk Markets

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

U.S. development aid has long been funded by the public sector. But USAID has recently begun a number of programs financed by private capital. This approach raises interesting questions about why public-private partnerships are becoming more prevalent, how the U.S. is encouraging private investment in risky markets and the prospects for such partnerships to become a dominant trend in U.S. development policy. more

Pakistan’s Kayani Leaves Behind Mixed Legacy of Reform as Army Chief

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

On Nov. 29, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, Pakistan’s powerful chief of army staff, will retire after a six-year tenure. Kayani commanded the Pakistan army through a tumultuous time and was instrumental in enabling it to better cope with security threats. He also distanced the army from politics after a decade of military rule. In other areas, however, his accomplishments were limited and the gains fragile. more

New Index Shows South Asia Is Ill-Equipped to Cope With Change

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

Floods and earthquakes in Pakistan, an economic slowdown in India and tenuous regime stability in Afghanistan: South Asia is currently experiencing many of the sudden shocks and long-term change-drivers that countries can face. A new index measures the ability of a country's government, businesses and society to cope with such changes—and the five South Asian countries included do not perform well. more

Pakistan’s Sharif Sees Foreign Policy Successes, Domestic Stasis in First 100 Days

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

Last week the Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) government under Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif completed its first 100 days in office. The elections in May, though marred by rigging and irregularities, made history as Pakistan’s first democratic transition. But Pakistanis seem less than jubilant. On security and the economy, Sharif has his work cut out for him, and his ability to deliver is limited. more

Pakistan’s Sharif Must Navigate Between Wary Military and Assertive Judiciary

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

Today’s Pakistan features not just a tussle for power between the civilian government and the military, but also an assertive judiciary. This puts Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif in a tough spot, as in the past he has battled both institutions. Now, in addition to solving major policy problems, one of Sharif’s major challenges will be navigating his way around a powerful military and an activist judiciary. more

Strategic Posture Review: Pakistan

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Report

Given domestic economic weaknesses, security competition with India and an antagonistic relationship with Afghanistan, Pakistan has traditionally sought external alliances with strong powers and pursued an offensive security policy. Nevertheless, there has been a dawning realization in Islamabad that a new approach is necessary, and as a result, Pakistan’s foreign and defense policies are undergoing important transformations. more

Afghanistan: A Renewed Effort Toward Peace With the Taliban

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

A series of major political developments this month all point toward new cooperative efforts by Pakistan, Afghanistan and the U.S. to bring the Taliban leadership into the negotiation process. Though major questions remain as to whether the effort will bear fruit, it represents what many fear is the last chance to avert a bloody fight for control of Kabul once foreign troops have left the country in 2014. more

Pakistan: A Foreign Policy in Transition?

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

In laying out a foreign policy agenda that she described as Pakistan’s “regional pivot” within Asia, Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar recently explained that Pakistan would pay more attention to building and stabilizing relations within its immediate region. The crucial question is whether this represents an actual shift in Pakistan’s policies, or if it is mere rhetoric.
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Toward a Sustainable Peace in Afghanistan: Part II

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

Despite the emphasis put on Pakistan’s role in stabilizing Afghanistan, its support is not the only regional element needed to ensure stability there. Several other states in the region have significant interests in Afghanistan and will also directly impact the outcome. Establishing a sustainable peace in Afghanistan will require maneuvering carefully within this minefield of divergent foreign interests. more

Toward a Sustainable Peace in Afghanistan: Part I

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

The U.S. military withdrawal from Afghanistan planned for 2014 means that some kind of a settlement with the Taliban is all but inevitable. However, the process of negotiating peace in Afghanistan faces several domestic challenges. Overcoming them will require a robust national reconciliation process that is far more extensive than the currently stalled negotiations toward a power-sharing agreement. more

New Rules of Engagement Could Limit Scope of U.S.-Pakistan Ties

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

On Nov. 26, NATO helicopters mistakenly killed 26 Pakistani soldiers at the Salala checkpoint. In the aftermath of the incident, Pakistan’s Parliamentary Committee on National Security began a comprehensive review of relations with the U.S. After nearly two months of deliberations, the PCNS is set to release its recommendations, with both positive and negative implications for the scope of future ties. more

Pakistan's Afghanistan Plan: Strategic Depth 2.0

By Shehzad H. Qazi
, on , Briefing

The relationship between Pakistan and the Afghan Taliban has often been described as Pakistan’s “double game” and is explained as arising from Islamabad’s desire to gain “strategic depth” in Afghanistan. While Pakistan is still pursuing “strategic depth," some evidence now suggests that the precise meaning of the concept has changed from its 1990s version. more