Kenneth Weisbrode

Kenneth Weisbrode is a historian at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute, Fiesole, Italy. He was formerly a defense analyst at the Atlantic Council of the U.S. and the International Institute for Strategic Studies. His most recent book is "The Atlantic Century" (Da Capo, 2009).

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Articles written by Kenneth Weisbrode

After Hegemony: America's Global Exit Strategy

By Kenneth Weisbrode
, , Briefing

What will America look like in a post-American world? The National Intelligence Council, with its just-released Global 2030 forecast, has become the latest voice to join the chorus of those who see U.S. hegemony giving way to a leading but less-dominant position. What impact will the loss of hegemony have on the way America engages with the world, and how will all this affect the ways Americans live? more

With Friends Like These: Influencing Allies and Clients

By Kenneth Weisbrode
, , Feature

How do different-sized powers establish order among themselves? And how do larger powers compel smaller and weaker ones to do their bidding? Though abstract, these two questions have concrete applications in the real world. Differential power relationships have been around since the first polities, later called states, came into existence, and over the course of history, various systems have arisen to manage them.
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The U.S. and Egypt: The Limits of Hegemony

By Kenneth Weisbrode
, , Briefing

The Obama administration's reaction to the dramatic events in Egypt has reminded optimists of the Bush administration's reaction in 1989 to revolutions in Eastern Europe and pessimists of the Carter administration's reaction a decade earlier to Iran's revolution. Washington's air of ambivalence, however, evokes a perennial condition of international relations, especially when those relations fall into the category of patron and client. more

Obama's World Tour: A Rising or a Setting Sun?

By Kenneth Weisbrode
, , Briefing

President Barack Obama's itinerary this month -- first to Asia, then to Europe -- will follow a path that recalls the setting of the sun. For some people, that image is a metaphor for American power, itself seen as waning. But the trip also suggests a strategic ambivalence between America's commitment to being both a European and an Asian power, and its different approaches to filling both roles.
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Obama's Afghanistan Blind Spot

There is an important element missing in the extensive coverage of Afghanistan: multilateral diplomacy. The Obama administration has been correct to emphasize the stakes for Pakistan in Afghanistan and, by extension, the seriousness with which the U.S. takes Pakistan's stability. But it has begun to sound like Afghanistan has only one border, and only one important neighbor. more

EU and NATO: Interlocking or Interblocking?

NATO and the EU now coexist with a confusing andambiguous set of overlapping tasks, with no clear functional orgeographical division of labor in the cards anytime soon. Despite having troops -- often from thesame country -- serving side by side in harm's way, playing it by ear isthe order of the day. Instead of interlocking, the two institutions havebecome interblocking. more