Jeremy Martin

Jeremy is a frequent commentator and writer on Latin American and energy issues speaking at international conferences and appearing in both print and broadcast media. He has testified before the US Congress on energy issues in Latin America. Working at a think tank -- the Institute of the Americas at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) -- Jeremy spends his time delving into the geopolitics of energy and closely following energy industry trends and policy issues across the Americas. Thanks to his upbringing, he's also a die-hard Red Sox fan, Civil War buff, and news junkie. Jeremy graduated with a History honors degree from The Citadel in Charleston, SC and a Masters in International Affairs/International Development from the American University in Washington, DC. He has yet to achieve his lifelong dream of being a Stand-Up Comic.

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Articles written by Jeremy Martin

As Chile Votes for President, Diversification Key to Addressing Energy Crunch

By Jeremy Martin
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As Chile heads into second-round voting Sunday, the country is seeking a more diverse energy policy. More specifically, security, efficiency and sustainability are the clear-cut issues facing policymakers and energy sector participants alike. With the country’s economic growth in recent years, the need to address the problem has become ever more urgent for Michelle Bachelet, Chile’s likely next president. more

U.S. Should Act Quickly on Transboundary Hydrocarbon Agreement With Mexico

By Jeremy Martin, Duncan Wood
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When U.S. President Barack Obama and Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto met in Mexico City yesterday, among the wide range of issues they discussed was the status of the Transboundary Hydrocarbons Agreement. Despite the economic and energy security benefits it promises to both sides, the agreement has been stalled in the U.S. for more than a year. Further delay on the agreement makes little sense. more

Mexico's Calderon Leaves Behind a Healthier Pemex, Oil Industry

By Jeremy Martin
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Critical assessments of Mexico’s oil industry in general and of its state-owned oil company, Pemex, in particular are commonplace, often with good reason: Both face many challenges in overcoming the historical legacies that have long undermined their performance. Nevertheless, when President Felipe Calderon leaves office on Dec. 1, he will be leaving both in better shape than when his presidency began. more

Falklands Oil Rekindles Argentina-U.K. Tensions in the South Atlantic

By Jeremy Martin
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Monday marked the 30th anniversary of the war between Argentina and Great Britain over the Falkland Islands, an anniversary that did not go unnoticed in either country. Exploratory oil drilling in the waters off the islands has stoked long-simmering tensions between Buenos Aires and London over British control of the islands. And as the drilling activity has ramped up, so has the rhetoric from Buenos Aires. more

U.S. Must Consider Energy Security in Canadian Oil Debate

By Jeremy Martin
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The proposed Keystone XL pipeline, which would bring crude oil from Canada's Alberta province to the U.S. Gulf Coast, has in many ways become ground zero in the U.S. debate over fossil fuels, the environment and climate change. Perhaps most relevant, though practically absent from the debate, is the increasing awareness that energy security must be included as part of the calculus in determining energy sources.
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Dam Controversies in Chile, Brazil Reflect Broader Energy Challenge

By Jeremy Martin
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Chile and Brazil have both been in the news in recent weeks due to massive and controversial hydroelectric projects that have provoked heated debates and large-scale protests. Both countries are struggling with the delicate issue of how to balance the need for increased energy supplies with important environmental concerns in cherished parts of each country -- the Amazon in Brazil and Patagonia in Chile. more

Latin America Struggles to Address Energy Subsidies

By Jeremy Martin
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Fuel prices have begun to soar across Latin America, confronting governments with the dilemma of how to balance fiscal demands with energy subsidies that are increasingly wreaking budgetary havoc. The Bolivian and Chilean governments' recent efforts to confront that dilemma led to dramatic images of unrest, leaving the core issue of how to square national budgets with rising prices and subsidies unresolved.
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China's Thirst for Oil and Its Impact on Latin America

Unless you have been living under a rock, the news that China has become the world's top energy consumer should not have been surprising. The International Energy Agency (IEA), whose data confirmed the dubious milestone, called it a "new age in the history of energy." Even if it is not entirely surprising, the news does beg further analysis because of its implications for global energy markets and international affairs. more

In Brazil, Oil With a Grain of Pre-Salt

By Jeremy Martin
, , World Politics Review

Brazil celebrated Independence Day twice this year: once on Sept. 7, the anniversary of its independence from Portuguese rule, but also a week before, on Aug. 31, when President Luiz Inacio Lula Da Silva announced a proposed overhaul of regulations governing the country's oil and gas industry. The new regulatory model, Lula said, would "free"  Brazil from poverty's dominion, delivered by oil. more

Summit of the Americas: Four Steps for Energy Security

By Jeremy Martin
, , World Politics Review

Until recently, this week's Summit of the Americas offered the hope of a new approach to coordinated regional energy policy. But with policymakers' attention increasingly divided by pressing economic issues, prospects for comprehensive dialogue on energy security in the Americas can only be described as diminished. Focusing on four attainable goals could help keep the meeting relevant. more