The recent Gaza conflict and the negotiations that eventually led to a cease-fire on Nov. 21 highlight some of the shifts currently taking place in the Middle East, particularly in Hamas’ relations with Qatar, Turkey and Egypt. These shifts represent a considerable challenge for the U.S. as it attempts to facilitate democratic transitions in the region while maintaining long-standing partnerships.

Hamas' Shifting Regional Alliances Complicate U.S. Mideast Strategy

By , , Briefing

The recent Gaza conflict and the negotiations that eventually led to a cease-fire on Nov. 21 highlight some of the shifts currently taking place in the Middle East, particularly in Hamas’ relations with Qatar, Turkey and Egypt. These shifts represent a considerable challenge for the U.S. as it attempts to facilitate democratic transitions in the region while maintaining long-standing partnerships.

In early November, Qatari Emir Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani became the first head of state to visit Gaza since Hamas took over the territory in a short but violent 2007 civil war with its rival Fatah. But if al-Thani’s visit was a sign that Hamas’ isolation was decreasing, then the holding of four-way talks among Egypt, Turkey, Qatar and Hamas as part of efforts to achieve a cease-fire with Israel was a flashing billboard. ...

To read the rest, sign up to try World Politics Review

Individual
Free Trial

Sign up for two weeks of free access with your credit card. Cancel any time during the free trial and you will be charged nothing.

subscribe

Institutional
Subscriptions

Request a free trial for your office or school. Everyone at a given site can get access through our institutional subscriptions.

request trial

Login

Already a member? Click the button below to login.

login