Though it will be at least another 12 hours before we know whether President Barack Obama or Republican nominee Mitt Romney will be in the White House come January 2013, we already know the most important challenge the next U.S presidential administration will face: how to deal with China. Yet, the bipartisan consensus on U.S policy toward China makes major changes unlikely regardless of the election outcome.

Global Insights: No Matter Who Wins, China Will Top U.S. Agenda

By , , Column

Though it will be at least another 12 hours before we know whether President Barack Obama or Republican nominee Mitt Romney will be in the White House come January 2013, we do already know the most important challenge the next U.S presidential administration will face: how to deal with China. Yet, the general bipartisan consensus on the appropriate U.S policy toward China makes major changes unlikely regardless of the election outcome.

Democrats and Republicans typically agree on the goal of achieving a peaceful China in a prosperous Asian region that reflects U.S-supported values of human rights. They also generally reject the idea of pursuing a containment strategy toward China and instead support continuing the strategy of mixing engagement and balancing that has been pursued by Republican and Democratic administrations since the Cold War. ...

To read the rest, sign up to try World Politics Review

Individual
Free Trial

  • TWO WEEKS FREE.
  • Cancel any time.
  • After two weeks, just $11.99 monthly or $94.99/year.
subscribe

Institutional
Subscriptions

Request a free trial for your office or school. Everyone at a given site can get access through our institutional subscriptions.

request trial

Login

Already a member? Click the button below to login.

login