The intellectual battle over the future of American hegemony has been joined, with some arguing that the American Century has ended, and others claiming that U.S. military and economic advantage are likely to persist. The debate is complicated by a number of factors, however. Shifts in hegemony rarely come with a herald, and U.S. choices can still either extend American hegemony, or hasten its decline.

Over the Horizon: The Future of American Hegemony

By , , Column

Editor's note: This will be Robert Farley’s final “Over the Horizon” column at World Politics Review. However, we look forward to featuring his work in WPR in the future. We'd like to take this opportunity to thank Robert for making “Over the Horizon” a must read over the past year and a half and to wish him success in all his many endeavors.

The intellectual battle over the future of American hegemony has been joined. Andrew Bacevich argues that the American Century has ended and that further American pretentions to hegemony will lead to disaster. Michael Cohen argues that the United States suffers from critical domestic problems that undermine long-term U.S. capability. On the other side of the debate, Dan Drezner, Robert Kagan and others (.pdf) argue that U.S. military and economic advantage are likely to persist over the foreseeable future. ...

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